Professor Jonathan Haskell Commissioner, Academic
Jonathan is Professor of Economics at Imperial College Business School, Imperial College London and Academic Director of the School. He was previously Professor and Head of Department at the Department of Economics, Queen Mary, University of London. He has taught at the University of Bristol and London Business School and been a visiting professor at the Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College, USA; Stern School of Business, New York University, USA; and the Australian National University.  

He is an elected member of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth (CRIW) and a research associate of the Centre for Economic Policy Research, the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, and the IZA, Bonn.

Since September 2015, he has been a member of the Financial Conduct Authority Competition Decisions Committee and the Payment System Regulator Enforcement and Competition Decisions Committee. 

Since February 2016, he has been a non-Executive Director of the UK Statistics Authority.

Between 2001-2010 was a Member, Reporting Panel of the Competition Commission (now the Competition and Markets Authority), on market inquiries into Mobile Phones, Home Credit and Airports, and the EMAP/ABI merger.

He has been on the editorial boards of Economica, Journal of Industrial Economics and Economic Policy.

Between 2013 and 2016, he was an elected member of the Council of the Royal Economic Society and between November 2012 and December 2015, a member of the "Research, Innovation, and Science Policy Experts" (RISE) high level group advising the European Commissioner for Research, Innovation, and Science on policy.

Jonathan’s research interests are growth, productivity and innovation in the knowledge economy and he has published papers on these topics in a number of journals. He is interested in exploring how best to measure and understand the contribution of investment in “intangible” or “knowledge” assets (such as software, design and R&D) to the economy, and what, if any, public support should be provided for such spending, especially public spending on the science base.